AWARENESS

Why Food Evolution

However, news about what the planet has to go through, due to intensive animal farming to face the needs of a growing population, is alarming. Just think that producing 1 Kg of meat requires about 15,000 litres of water and that the CO2 emissions resulting from these activities account for 18% of all emissions, not to mention that about 70 billion animals are slaughtered every year. These figures reveal an upsetting global condition. According to FAO, if we continue like this, things can only get worse. According to their estimates, we’ll go from an annual meat consumption of 40 million tonnes at the beginning of the century to a whopping 500 million tonnes in 2050.
Over the past few decades, the significant increase in the number of cattle farms and the animals’ food needs have replaced fields, grasslands, woodlands, and large portions of forests, aka the “green lung” of the planet. All this leads to a series of relentless consequences for us and our planet.
Just think about global warming or the infamous greenhouse effect, which are mostly a result of the release into the atmosphere of carbon dioxide produced by animals during normal digestive processes, or the contamination of aquifers, which every day are flooded by thousands of tonnes of polluting waste material. Other worrying consequences are the growing desertification and the unimaginable waste of freshwater used to make this perverse mechanism work, not to mention all the actions that highlight how unnatural and inhumane all this is.

Although all these considerations are far from reassuring and the ecosystem’s situation increasingly fragile, it is somewhat comforting to notice that the number of people who choose to reduce or eliminate meat consumption is on the rise.
This positive trend is the result of more information and awareness about animals and environmental issues, which, unfortunately, are affecting us more and more. Many people are becoming aware of the benefits of a predominantly vegetarian diet and the positive impact this would have on the planet and are trying to change their eating habits and reduce all those actions that could damage them and the planet.

Let’s leave the moral and environmental reasons for which more and more people are deciding to stop eating animals aside for a moment. It’s the conditions in which these animals are reared and the frequent human-animal contaminations (e.g. bird flu, mad cow disease, swine flu) that should dissipate any doubts on the importance of choosing a vegetarian diet. The thought of the large amounts of hormones and antibiotics continuously administered to animals, such as chickens, cows, or pigs, should discourage us from eating them.
It is now clear that meat consumption (especially red meat) can be, or rather is, very harmful to our health. Experts and medicine luminaries often stress this factor. In fact, both the Italian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation have published guidelines to reduce the burden of cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

AWARENESS

Why Food Evolution

However, news about what the planet has to go through, due to intensive animal farming to face the needs of a growing population, is alarming. Just think that producing 1 Kg of meat requires about 15,000 litres of water and that the CO2 emissions resulting from these activities account for 18% of all emissions, not to mention that about 70 billion animals are slaughtered every year. These figures reveal an upsetting global condition. According to FAO, if we continue like this, things can only get worse. According to their estimates, we’ll go from an annual meat consumption of 40 million tonnes at the beginning of the century to a whopping 500 million tonnes in 2050.
Over the past few decades, the significant increase in the number of cattle farms and the animals’ food needs have replaced fields, grasslands, woodlands, and large portions of forests, aka the “green lung” of the planet. All this leads to a series of relentless consequences for us and our planet.
Just think about global warming or the infamous greenhouse effect, which are mostly a result of the release into the atmosphere of carbon dioxide produced by animals during normal digestive processes, or the contamination of aquifers, which every day are flooded by thousands of tonnes of polluting waste material. Other worrying consequences are the growing desertification and the unimaginable waste of freshwater used to make this perverse mechanism work, not to mention all the actions that highlight how unnatural and inhumane all this is.

Although all these considerations are far from reassuring and the ecosystem’s situation increasingly fragile, it is somewhat comforting to notice that the number of people who choose to reduce or eliminate meat consumption is on the rise.
This positive trend is the result of more information and awareness about animals and environmental issues, which, unfortunately, are affecting us more and more. Many people are becoming aware of the benefits of a predominantly vegetarian diet and the positive impact this would have on the planet and are trying to change their eating habits and reduce all those actions that could damage them and the planet.

Let’s leave the moral and environmental reasons for which more and more people are deciding to stop eating animals aside for a moment. It’s the conditions in which these animals are reared and the frequent human-animal contaminations (e.g. bird flu, mad cow disease, swine flu) that should dissipate any doubts on the importance of choosing a vegetarian diet. The thought of the large amounts of hormones and antibiotics continuously administered to animals, such as chickens, cows, or pigs, should discourage us from eating them.
It is now clear that meat consumption (especially red meat) can be, or rather is, very harmful to our health. Experts and medicine luminaries often stress this factor. In fact, both the Italian Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation have published guidelines to reduce the burden of cardiovascular diseases and cancer.